Calendar | For Your Patients | PHA Main Site | Contact Us | About Us | Not a registered user? Sign up here.

Resource Library

Dyspnea, Depression and Health Related Quality of Life [HRQoL] in Patients with Pulmonary Arterial hypertension

Eun Ji Kim

Sameer Verma

Sonu Sahni

Katherine Athanasiou

PURVESH PATEL

Nina Kohn

Arunabh Talwar

Reviews

  Sign in to add a review

0 comments
Leave a Comment

Conference: 2014 International PHA Conference and Scientific Sessions

Release Date: 06.21.2014

Presentation Type: Abstracts

File Download: 2014 Conference Abstract - Arunabh Talwar

Download Adobe Acrobat

The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between HRQoL, self reported dyspnea and depression in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between HRQoL, self reported dyspnea and depression in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Methods: 64 patients were enrolled in the study. 45 patients [11 males, 34 females; mean age 51.3 years; with confirmed PAH (WHO Group I), and 19 patients [9 males, 10 females; mean age 69.8 years] with WHO Group III. Patients completed Medical Outcomes Study Short–Form 36 V2 to measure generic HRQOL, Modified Medical Research Council [mMRC] Dyspnea Scale and Zung Depression scale. Physical Health Composite Scores [PCS] and Mental Health Composite Scores [MCS] were derived from SF36V2.  For each scale, Mann-Whitney test was used to examine the association between WHO Groups (Group I or Group III) and that scale. The Spearman correlation coefficient was computed to determine the degree of correlation between each pair of scales. Summary statistics are reported as medians and 25th percentile (Q1) to 75th percentile (Q3).

Results: Dyspnea was significantly higher in WHO Group III (p<0.0036). [Median dyspnea in Group III 2.0 (Q1 to Q3:1.0 to 4.0) whereas median dyspnea in Group 1 1.0 (Q1 to Q3:1.0 to 2.0).]. MCS (SF36) was significantly lower in Group III patients (p<0.0085). [Median MCS in Group III was 35.3 (Q1 to Q3:28.5 to 48.7) and 51.5 (Q1 to Q3:38.6 to 57.2) in Group I patients]. In PAH patients there was a significant correlation between dyspnea and PCS (r=-0.660, p<0.0001,n=36) and between dyspnea and MCS (r=-0.342, p<0.0411,n=36). There was a  significant correlation between the Zung depression scale  and PCS (r=-0.578, p<0.0150,n=17) and between Zung depression scale  and MCS (r=-0.752, p<0.0005,n=17).

Conclusions: Patients with PAH suffer from diminished HRQOL which correlates with their dyspnea and underlying depression. Healthcare providers need to appreciate the psychoscocial impairment of patients with PAH. Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Cognitive behavioral interventions may benefit these patients. Further studies are necessary to evaluate and design interventions to improve HRQOL in these patients.

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between HRQoL, self reported dyspnea and depression in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Methods: 64 patients were enrolled in the study. 45 patients [11 males, 34 females; mean age 51.3 years; with confirmed PAH (WHO Group I), and 19 patients [9 males, 10 females; mean age 69.8 years] with WHO Group III. Patients completed Medical Outcomes Study Short–Form 36 V2 to measure generic HRQOL, Modified Medical Research Council [mMRC] Dyspnea Scale and Zung Depression scale. Physical Health Composite Scores [PCS] and Mental Health Composite Scores [MCS] were derived from SF36V2. For each scale, Mann-Whitney test was used to examine the association between WHO Groups (Group I or Group III) and that scale. The Spearman correlation coefficient was computed to determine the degree of correlation between each pair of scales. Summary statistics are reported as medians and 25th percentile (Q1) to 75th percentile (Q3).

Results: Dyspnea was significantly higher in WHO Group III (p<0.0036). [Median dyspnea in Group III 2.0 (Q1 to Q3:  1.0 to 4.0) whereas median dyspnea in Group 1 1.0 (Q1 to Q3:1.0 to 2.0).]. MCS (SF36) was significantly lower in Group III patients (p<0.0085). [Median MCS in Group III was 35.3 (Q1 to Q3: 28.5 to 48.7) and 51.5 (Q1 to Q3:  38.6 to 57.2) in Group I patients]. In PAH patients there was a significant correlation between dyspnea and PCS (r=-0.660, p<0.0001,n=36) and between dyspnea and MCS (r=-0.342, p<0.0411,n=36). There was a significant correlation between the Zung depression scale and PCS (r=-0.578, p<0.0150,n=17) and between Zung depression scale and MCS (r=-0.752, p<0.0005,n=17).

Conclusions: Patients with PAH suffer from diminished HRQOL which correlates with their dyspnea and underlying depression. Healthcare providers need to appreciate the psychoscocial impairment of patients with PAH. Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Cognitive behavioral interventions may benefit these patients.  Further studies are necessary to evaluate and design interventions to improve HRQOL in these patients.

Type: Clinical Science

Tables and Figures

Arunabh Talwar Abstract - 2014 Conference

Arunabh Talwar Abstract II - 2014 Conference